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Rob Scott

Rob Scott

Chief Medical Officer, AbbVie

Dr. Rob Scott is Zimbabwean born and studied medicine at the University of Cape Town. He began his industry career with J&J in South Africa. In 1992 he joined Pfizer and became the Global Therapeutic Head for CV and Metabolic, responsible for what was then the world’s largest pharmaceutical product and the largest cardiovascular product – Lipitor and Norvasc.

In 2002, he became the Chief Medical Officer and Executive Vice President of R&D of AtheroGenics, an emerging Pharma company in Atlanta Georgia. While at AtheroGenics, he designed and implemented the first large cardiovascular outcomes study to be wholly performed by a small biotech company. In 2008, he became the CMO and Head of Development of Cerenis Therapeutics in Toulouse, France. In 2010, he joined Amgen as the Global Therapeutic Area Head for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Development. At Amgen, he was responsible for accelerating the development of Repatha which was the first PCSK9 inhibitor to be submitted in Europe and the USA. He also successfully submitted Corlanor which was approved without a single US trial participant. In 2014, Dr Scott was also appointed as the head of a newly created Center of Excellence focused on using predictive analytics for designing and implementing clinical trials at Amgen, called the Development Design Center. In 2015, he took over the leadership of the Neuroscience, Bone, Nephrology and Inflammation Franchise.

Since 2016, Dr Scott has led the Development Team at Abbvie and served as the Chief Medical Officer. Dr Scott was a member of the FDA Cardiac and Renal Drug Advisory Committee from 2012 to 2016 and was an occasional stand-in on the Endocrine and Metabolic Advisory Committee. During his career, he has been involved with almost every therapeutic area and mode of drug delivery as well as both small molecules and biologics.  He developed the first drug combination to simultaneously treat two different disease states – Caduet.

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